Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Metacognition and Art Production as Problem Solving: A Study of Third Grade Students

Patricia D. Goldberg
Visual Arts Research
Vol. 31, No. 2 (2005), pp. 67-75
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20715385
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Metacognition and Art Production as Problem Solving: A Study of Third Grade Students
Preview not available

Abstract

This study examined the impact of metacognitive instruction on the development of metacognitive skills and art production of third-grade students. In this study, the performance of specific art tasks of students in two third grade classes in a rural school in the Southeastern U.S. was analyzed and compared. One class included yearlong instruction in metacognitive thinking strategies, the other did not. Findings revealed that students in the metacognitive class used more metacognitive thinking throughout the entire art making process, and were more likely to understand the thematic nature of the art problem, generate more strategies, and develop a solution clearly related to the theme. This study suggests that through collaboration between classroom teachers and art teachers to encourage metacognitive thinking, student learning can be impacted in both the regular classroom and the art class.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72
  • Thumbnail: Page 
73
    73
  • Thumbnail: Page 
74
    74
  • Thumbnail: Page 
75
    75