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Pictorial Depth Cue Orientation Influences the Magnitude of Perceived Depth

R. J. Miller
Visual Arts Research
Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 1997), pp. 97-124
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20715898
Page Count: 28
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Pictorial Depth Cue Orientation Influences the Magnitude of Perceived Depth
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Abstract

Two experiments with young adults examined the effect of perspective cue orientation on the magnitude of perceived depth. Perceived depth was assessed directly using ratings and paried-comparisons, and indirectly using a size perception task (the Ponzo illusion). Independent variables included orientation, gender, instructions (retinal versus apparent), and training in the interpretation of pictorial depth cues. The effect of instruction was nonsignificant. Both experiments showed orientation to be important: Arrays with the apex of radiating perspective lines at the top produced greater perceived depth and perceived size of a pictorially-far stimulus than did any other cardinal orientation. These results were interpreted in terms of constancy scaling. In both experiments, females were more susceptible than males to the Ponzo. This effect was not a function of gender differences in depth perception, but may reflect gender differences in spatial ability. Finally, Experiment 2 showed that systematic experience with pictorial depth significantly increased the perceived size of pictorially far stimuli.

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