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THE OCCURRENCE OF ANGUILLICOLA CRASSUS (KUWAHAR, NIMI, AND HAGAKI, 1974), AN INTRODUCED NEMATODE, IN AN UNEXPLOITED WESTERN IRISH EEL POPULATION

M. Morrissey and T.K. McCarthy
Biology and Environment: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy
Vol. 107B, No. 1 (2007), pp. 13-18
Published by: Royal Irish Academy
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20728616
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
THE OCCURRENCE OF ANGUILLICOLA CRASSUS (KUWAHAR, NIMI, AND HAGAKI, 1974), AN INTRODUCED NEMATODE, IN AN UNEXPLOITED WESTERN IRISH EEL POPULATION
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Abstract

The presence of Anguillicola crassus, an introduced Asian parasite of eels, into south Connemara is reported. European eels Anguilla anguilla were found to be infected in the three basins of varying salinity of Lough Ahalia, but eels sampled in the nearby marine Camus Bay were uninfected. Variations in infection parameters were analysed. It was concluded that the parasite is a recent introduction to the river system. The highest prevalence (63.1%) and mean intensity (4.22) of infection in the lower, most saline, basin of the lough suggest that the parasite was introduced to the River Screebe system at that location. Potential dispersal mechanisms by which the parasite may have been introduced to such a relatively isolated location and to such apparently unexploited eel populations are discussed.

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