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Low energy diet and intracranial pressure in women with idiopathic intracranial hypertension: prospective cohort study

Alexandra J Sinclair, Michael A Burdon, Peter G Nightingale, Alexandra K Ball, Peter Good, Timothy D Matthews, Andrew Jacks, Mark Lawden, Carl E Clarke, Paul M Stewart, Elizabeth A Walker, Jeremy W Tomlinson, Saaeha Rauz and Digne
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 341, No. 7764 (17 July 2010), p. 138
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20734830
Page Count: 1
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Abstract

STUDY QUESTION Is weight loss effective at reducing intracranial pressure and treating patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension? SUMMARY ANSWER In women with idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a low energy (calorie) weight reducing diet for three months was associated with significant reductions in intracranial pressure and improvement in symptoms and papilloedema. WHAT IS KNOWN AND WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS Weight loss is a commonly advocated treatment in idiopathic intracranial hypertension but prospective evidence for efficacy, particularly in reducing intracranial pressure, has previously been lacking. Weight reduction is associated with reduced intracranial pressure, papilloedema, and symptoms including headache. Objective imaging measures to quantify papilloedema will enhance clinical care and contribute to design of future clinical trials.

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