Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Die Rolle der Frau bei der Liebeskrankheit und den Liebestränken

Urs Benno Birchler
Sudhoffs Archiv
Bd. 59, H. 3 (1975 3. QUARTAL), pp. 311-320
Published by: Franz Steiner Verlag
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20776365
Page Count: 10
Topics: Hats, Viruses
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($32.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Die Rolle der Frau bei der Liebeskrankheit und den Liebestränken
Preview not available

Abstract

The patients of love-sickness in Antiquity and the Middle Ages have been by preference males. The method to treat them was already described by Ovid in his Remedia Amoris. A woman, represented as ugly and repulsive as possible, should frighten off the lover from his malady. It is interesting, that love-sickness in the Age of Enlightenment changed to a gynaecological affection, whereby the sleeping with a healthy and strong male was recommended as the best therapy. In the last two centuries love-sickness lost its importance in Medicine. In Erotomany, as a sexually indifferent disease, we can still find today some remnants. — Love-potions (philtre) have been a well known problem in medical literature till to the 18th century. It was not only supposed to have been women who prepared the philtres, but note-worthy enough, the ingredients used were also often parts of women, such as: menstrual blood, mucous secretion, placenta and so on. Such an "inphiltration" has been followed by various diseases, in particular by love-sickness. Some authors assumed that love-sickness was caused by a real "Virus amatorium" in the menstrual blood. Only with difficulty medicine could free itself from the concept of the "venomous woman", and even until today the idea of a "Menotoxin" has remained.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[311]
    [311]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315
  • Thumbnail: Page 
316
    316
  • Thumbnail: Page 
317
    317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
319
    319
  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320