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Wissenschaftliche Sozialhygiene und gesellschaftliche Praxis im Deutschen Reich: Ein Beitrag zur Entwicklung der Sozialhygiene im ersten Drittel des 20. Jahrhunderts

Klaus-Dieter Thomann
Sudhoffs Archiv
Bd. 68, H. 1 (1984), pp. 61-76
Published by: Franz Steiner Verlag
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20776897
Page Count: 16
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Wissenschaftliche Sozialhygiene und gesellschaftliche Praxis im Deutschen Reich: Ein Beitrag zur Entwicklung der Sozialhygiene im ersten Drittel des 20. Jahrhunderts
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Abstract

Despite significant advances, bacteriology — which tended to neglect the importance of social factors in health and illness — was ill-suited to eliminate the health problems of the lower social strata towards the end of the 19th century because these problems were grounded in living conditions resulting from industrialization. Consequently, supported by political pressure from the growing labor movement and by economic considerations of the employers and of the governement, social hygiene was developed as a science supplementing bacteriology. Its main representatives, including Alfons Fischer, Adolf Gottstein, Alfred Grotjahn, and Wilhelm Hanauer, endeavoured to achieve political changes resulting in better health of the lower social strata. Their main areas of concern were maternal and child health, school hygiene, industrial medicine, public health education, and housing and food conditions. Due to a number of adverse circumstances, however, the objectives of the social hygienists were realized only partially.

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