Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Are Host Genetics the Predominant Determinant of Persistent Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Carriage in Humans?

Raymond Ruimy, Cécile Angebault, Félix Djossou, Claire Dupont, Loïc Epelboin, Sophie Jarraud, Laurence Armand Lefevre, Michèle Bes, Brandusa Elena Lixandru, Mélanie Bertine, Assiya El Miniai, Magaly Renard, Régis Marc Bettinger, Mathilde Lescat, Olivier Clemont, Gilles Peroz, Gerard Lina, Mehri Tavakol, François Vandenesch, Alex van Belkum, François Rousset and Antoine Andremont
The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Vol. 202, No. 6 (15 September 2010), pp. 924-934
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20780206
Page Count: 11
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Are Host Genetics the Predominant Determinant of Persistent Nasal
              Staphylococcus aureus Carriage in Humans?
Preview not available

Abstract

Background. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is influenced by multifactorial interactions which are difficult to study in open populations. Therefore, we concomitantly assessed the epidemiological, microbiological, and human-genetic carriage-related factors in a nearly closed population. Methods. In 2006 and 2008, we collected nasal S. aureus strains, human DNA, and epidemiological data from 154 adult Wayampi Amerindians living in an isolated village in the Amazonian forest. The genetics of the strains (multilocus sequence type, spa type, and toxin-content type), epidemiological risk factors, antibiotic exposure, and allelic polymorphism of human genes putatively involved in carriage of the persistent carriers were compared with those of other volunteers. Results. Overall carriage prevalence was 41.7% in 2006 and 57.8% in 2008, but the overall prevalence of persistent carriage was only 26%. The rare and phylogenetically distant multilocus sequence type ST1223 was present in 18.5% of the carriers in 2006 and 34.8% in 2008. No epidemiological factors or antibiotic exposure were significantly associated with persistent carriage, but single nucleotide polymorphism distribution in C-reactive proteins C2042T and C1184T and interleukin-4 C524T genes was significantly associated (P = .02, by global test). Conclusion. Host genetic factors appeared to be the predominant determinant for S. aureus persistent nasal carriage in humans.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
924
    924
  • Thumbnail: Page 
925
    925
  • Thumbnail: Page 
926
    926
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[927]
    [927]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
928
    928
  • Thumbnail: Page 
929
    929
  • Thumbnail: Page 
[930]
    [930]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
931
    931
  • Thumbnail: Page 
932
    932
  • Thumbnail: Page 
933
    933
  • Thumbnail: Page 
934
    934