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Spatial correlation between brain aerobic glycolysis and amyloid-ß (Aß) deposition

Andrei G. Vlassenko, S. Neil Vaishnavi, Lars Couture, Dana Sacco, Benjamin J. Shannon, Robert H. Mach, John C. Morris, Marcus E. Raichle and Mark A. Mintun
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 107, No. 41 (October 12, 2010), pp. 17763-17767
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20780532
Page Count: 5
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Spatial correlation between brain aerobic glycolysis and amyloid-ß (Aß) deposition
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Abstract

Amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque deposition can precede the clinical manifestations of dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) by many years and can be associated with changes in brain metabolism. Both the Aβ plaque deposition and the changes in metabolism appear to be concentrated in the brain's default-mode network. In contrast to prior studies of brain metabolism which viewed brain metabolism from a unitary perspective that equated glucose utilization with oxygen consumption, we here report on regional glucose use apart from that entering oxidative phosphorylation (so-called "aerobic glycolysis"). Using PET, we found that the spatial distribution of aerobic glycolysis in normal young adults correlates spatially with Aβ deposition in individuals with DAT and cognitively normal participants with elevated Aβ, suggesting a possible link between regional aerobic glycolysis in young adulthood and later development of Alzheimer pathology.

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