Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

RECONCEPTUALIZING AGGRESSION

Michael Anderson
Duke Law Journal
Vol. 60, No. 2 (November 2010), pp. 411-451
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20787393
Page Count: 41
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
RECONCEPTUALIZING AGGRESSION
Preview not available

Abstract

In 1947, the International Military Tribunals at Nuremberg and Tokyo declared that aggressive war was no longer a generic breach of international law implicating only state responsibility. It was the supreme international crime, one for which individuals could be prosecuted and punished. On the plane of international law, the decision was monumentally important. But for nearly seventy years, the promise it represented withered as the international community struggled to draw the precise contours of the offense. That promise was supposedly revived on June 11, 2010. At the close of the Review Conference of the International Criminal Court in Kampala, Uganda, the Assembly of States Parties to the International Criminal Court adopted the first precise, widely accepted definition of aggression. But rather than a groundbreaking achievement, the definition is anachronistic, dangerous, and unworkable. Its exclusive focus on state behavior creates an overly restricted conception of aggression that cannot be applied to the present reality of international armed conflict. Modern aggression is increasingly perpetrated by nonstate actors whose nature and characteristics place them outside the most widely accepted definition of the state. Even abandoning this traditional conception of statehood for a constructive interpretation cannot guarantee that the definition will encompass all relevant nonstate actors. This Note argues that the current state-centric approach thus creates a backward-looking definition that cannot be given practical effect without either weakening the international system or undermining efforts to prosecute aggression and suppress global terrorism. Consequently, the Assembly of States Parties should rewrite the definition of aggression to expressly include both states and nonstate groups.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[411]
    [411]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
412
    412
  • Thumbnail: Page 
413
    413
  • Thumbnail: Page 
414
    414
  • Thumbnail: Page 
415
    415
  • Thumbnail: Page 
416
    416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
417
    417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
418
    418
  • Thumbnail: Page 
419
    419
  • Thumbnail: Page 
420
    420
  • Thumbnail: Page 
421
    421
  • Thumbnail: Page 
422
    422
  • Thumbnail: Page 
423
    423
  • Thumbnail: Page 
424
    424
  • Thumbnail: Page 
425
    425
  • Thumbnail: Page 
426
    426
  • Thumbnail: Page 
427
    427
  • Thumbnail: Page 
428
    428
  • Thumbnail: Page 
429
    429
  • Thumbnail: Page 
430
    430
  • Thumbnail: Page 
431
    431
  • Thumbnail: Page 
432
    432
  • Thumbnail: Page 
433
    433
  • Thumbnail: Page 
434
    434
  • Thumbnail: Page 
435
    435
  • Thumbnail: Page 
436
    436
  • Thumbnail: Page 
437
    437
  • Thumbnail: Page 
438
    438
  • Thumbnail: Page 
439
    439
  • Thumbnail: Page 
440
    440
  • Thumbnail: Page 
441
    441
  • Thumbnail: Page 
442
    442
  • Thumbnail: Page 
443
    443
  • Thumbnail: Page 
444
    444
  • Thumbnail: Page 
445
    445
  • Thumbnail: Page 
446
    446
  • Thumbnail: Page 
447
    447
  • Thumbnail: Page 
448
    448
  • Thumbnail: Page 
449
    449
  • Thumbnail: Page 
450
    450
  • Thumbnail: Page 
451
    451