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DOES NYMPHAEID DISTRIBUTION REFLECT THE SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY OF ABIOTIC CONDITIONS IN A SHALLOW LAKE?

Mariusz Pełechaty
Belgian Journal of Botany
Vol. 140, No. 1, Proceedings of the International Symposium on Aquatic Vascular Plants (2007), pp. 73-82
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20794625
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
DOES NYMPHAEID DISTRIBUTION REFLECT THE SPATIAL HETEROGENEITY OF ABIOTIC CONDITIONS IN A SHALLOW LAKE?
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Abstract

In terms of phytosociology Nuphar lutea and Nymphaea alba are species characteristic of the same nymphaeid association. In many lakes, however, they develop separate communities. Habitat differences between patches of both species may thus be expected. The aim of this study was to find out if neighbouring patches of Nuphar lutea and Nymphaea alba were characterised by different water and substratum properties. Field investigations ware carried out in a shallow lake with well-developed macrophytic vegetation (Lake Jarosławieckie, Wielkopolski National Park, mid-Western Poland). An additional sampling site was located in the macrophyte-free mid-lake. Water and substratum samples were collected twelve times during a two-year study. Considering the whole data set, the water properties did not differentiate significantly the studied phytocoenoses and the open water. Temporal differences appeared to be more significant. In the case of substratum properties, habitat differentiation was found for organic matter content, which was significantly higher at the Nymphaea alba site, whereas total nitrogen content was higher at the mid-lake site. Seasonal dynamics of the habitats followed a similar pattern for the water properties, whereas differences in organic matter content were found for the substratum properties.

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