Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

HYDROLOGICAL AND VEGETATION ANALYSIS OF AN ALLUVIAL FLOODPLAIN IN BELGIUM

Jan Peters, Roeland Samson, Pascal Boeckx, Wajira K. Balasooriya and Niko E. C. Verhoest
Belgian Journal of Botany
Vol. 142, No. 1 (2009), pp. 19-38
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20794669
Page Count: 20
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
HYDROLOGICAL AND VEGETATION ANALYSIS OF AN ALLUVIAL FLOODPLAIN IN BELGIUM
Preview not available

Abstract

In this paper, results from an intensive two-year monitoring campaign of a wetland gradient are presented and analyzed. Two spatially adjacent sites along a wetland gradient are described by means of abiotic variables, groundwater level, and soil temperature and soil moisture at several depths throughout the vertical soil profile. The vegetation of the sites is described on the basis of a species cover inventory, and two different vegetation types are distinguished along the wetland gradient: Arrhenatheretum elatioris at the highest end of the gradient and Caricetum gracilis at the lowest end. Aboveground biomass and leaf area index of both Arrhenatheretum elatioris and Caricetum gracilis were measured on a monthly basis, and their seasonal variation could be related to specific site conditions. Furthermore, evidence was found that vegetation was not passive to the environmental site conditions but actively influenced them. The groundwater at the lower Caricetum gracilis site showed diurnal fluctuations with amplitudes up to 10 cm, which could be attributed to transpiration losses by phreatophytes.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[19]
    [19]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28
  • Thumbnail: Page 
29
    29
  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38