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Organ donation

Paul J Frost, Stephen Leadbeatter and Matthew P Wise
BMJ: British Medical Journal
Vol. 341, No. 7782 (20 November 2010), pp. 1097-1101
Published by: BMJ
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20800504
Page Count: 5
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Abstract

KEY POINTS Organ and tissue transplantation can save and greatly improve lives, but a paucity of organs means that many patients die awaiting transplantation Junior doctors' lack of familiarity with donation contributes to low donation rates, but donation should be considered as a routine part of end of life management Specialist nurses for organ donation can be contacted through the hospital switchboard and can advise junior doctors on any aspect of donation Families are more willing to consent to donation if they understand brain stem death and perceive that their relative has received high quality care.

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