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College Student Identities and Behaviors

DONALD C. REITZES and Donald T. Reitzes
Sociological Focus
Vol. 13, No. 2 (April, 1980), pp. 113-124
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20831151
Page Count: 12
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College Student Identities and Behaviors
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Abstract

The investigation of college students provides an opportunity to apply empirically an identity perspective and to expand current research of the relationship between identity and behaviors. Identity refers to cognitive and affective meanings attributed to the self as an object in a role or social situation. Using the Burke-Tully (1977) procedure for the measurement of identity and modifying Clark and Trow's (1966) discussion of college student subculture, seven identity dimensions were created and related to the three performance variables of educational expectations, participation in social activities, and academic performance. Results show that each of the identity dimensions are related to at least one performance variable and that the direction of the relationships supports the explanation that identity may help individuals select behaviors and plans consistent with self meanings.

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