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Socioeconomic Status and Infant Mortality: Evidence from a Rural Agricultural State

DONALD J. ADAMCHAK and WILLIAM C. FLINT
Sociological Focus
Vol. 16, No. 1 (January, 1983), pp. 77-89
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20831272
Page Count: 13
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Socioeconomic Status and Infant Mortality: Evidence from a Rural Agricultural State
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Abstract

This research examines the nature and extent to which the tradtional inverse relationship between infant mortality and socioeconomic status holds true in Kansas for the years around 1950, 1960, and 1970. A social-area ranking approach and correlation and regression analysis failed to show the significant inverse relationship reported by other researchers. Contrary to expectations, a blurring and narrowing of this relationship resulted over the three time periods. A significant negative correlation resulted between the percentage of rural farm residents in counties and infant mortality, indicating that the social organization characteristics of a rural state may provide a quality of life that transcends traditional socioeconomic differentials.

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