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Men, Women, and Informal Organization in Manufacturing

SANDRA L. ALBRECHT and PAUL GOLDMAN
Sociological Focus
Vol. 18, No. 4 (October 1985), pp. 279-288
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20831373
Page Count: 10
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Men, Women, and Informal Organization in Manufacturing
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Abstract

This paper compares female and male workers' informal organization in blue-collar workplaces. We examine whether females and males organize themselves in a similar or dissimilar fashion. Because little research has been devoted to this subject, we suggest tentative answers and issue a call for further research. The high visibility of research that has been done on informal organization obscures the fact that there is so little of it. Moreover, few researchers have studied female factory workers. A review of relevant research suggests the importance of the labor process itself in determining the shape of informal organization. Female workers seem to organize informally around questions of production in much the same way as male workers. The paper concludes with a discussion of the range of research questions yet to be addressed both in terms of the actual labor process of factory workers and comparative issues between female and male factory workers.

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