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Sales Force Activities and Marketing Strategies in Industrial Firms: Relationships and Implications

James Cross, Steven W. Hartley, William Rudelius and Michael J. Vassey
The Journal of Personal Selling and Sales Management
Vol. 21, No. 3 (Summer 2001), pp. 199-206
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20832596
Page Count: 8
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Sales Force Activities and Marketing Strategies in Industrial Firms: Relationships and Implications
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Abstract

This study explores the role of the sales force in formulating and executing marketing strategies. Specifically, the relationships between sales force activities such as providing information about customer needs, hiring and training salespeople, and assessing new market segments and four marketing strategies (market penetration, product development, market development, diversification) are examined. Results indicate that the use of sales force activities is related to a firm's strategic choices, and that the relationships vary by firm size and type of offering.

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