Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Social Impact of War

John Modell and Timothy Haggerty
Annual Review of Sociology
Vol. 17 (1991), pp. 205-224
Published by: Annual Reviews
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2083341
Page Count: 20
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($36.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Social Impact of War
Preview not available

Abstract

The authors, by reviewing the recent work of several behavioral and social science disciplines concerned with the impact of war upon society, suggest that the study of war's social ramifications has been characterized by the publication of empirical work that neglects, to some extent, the larger sociological implications of war as well as its ability to reorder society. The work published over the last two decades and reviewed here was written in the United States in the wake of the Vietnam conflict. This work has examined the implications of military manpower recruitment and training, as well as the psychological and economic implications of wartime service. The immediacy of this conflict, however, may have deterred sociological analysts from systematically examining the macroscopic implications of social change, a void that is remedied, in part, by historical and literary analyses that consider the long-range impacts of past wars on their belligerent societies. Finally, the authors propose that the study of the life course may offer one avenue of inquiry that can connect the micro- and macro- levels of analysis, thus connecting the soldier's story to that of his changing society.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224