Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Den kroppsliga differentieringens praktik: Övervikt och nätdejting på intimitetens marknad / The practice of bodily differentiation: Overweight and internet dating on the market of intimacy

Roland Paulsen
Sociologisk Forskning
Vol. 47, No. 1 (2010), pp. 5-28
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20853695
Page Count: 24
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Den kroppsliga differentieringens praktik: Övervikt och nätdejting på intimitetens marknad / The practice of bodily differentiation: Overweight and internet dating on the market of intimacy
Preview not available

Abstract

With the emergence of Internet dating, the procedure for choosing a partner has been radically changed. Given the initial invisibility of the body when Internet dating, one might presume that looks become less important when searching for partners online. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth. Based on twelve interviews with Internet daters of which six define themselves as overweight, the reproduction of bodily distinction in both mediated and direct communication is here being studied. A recurrent theme among the interviewees is the dissappointment of the first date face to face. Ironically the importance of looks (or bodily capital) appears to be even more vital when dating on Internet than when building relationships "in real life". Besides the disappointment of the first date in real life, the obese women in this study could also gather information of their value on the market of intimacy through being met by serious harassments and in exclusively being treated as sexual objects. Despite its strong association with the physical body, bodily capital can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from other forms of capital. From this point of view, the possibility of less repressive forms of intimacy is discussed.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11
  • Thumbnail: Page 
12
    12
  • Thumbnail: Page 
13
    13
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14
    14
  • Thumbnail: Page 
15
    15
  • Thumbnail: Page 
16
    16
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17
    17
  • Thumbnail: Page 
18
    18
  • Thumbnail: Page 
19
    19
  • Thumbnail: Page 
20
    20
  • Thumbnail: Page 
21
    21
  • Thumbnail: Page 
22
    22
  • Thumbnail: Page 
23
    23
  • Thumbnail: Page 
24
    24
  • Thumbnail: Page 
25
    25
  • Thumbnail: Page 
26
    26
  • Thumbnail: Page 
27
    27
  • Thumbnail: Page 
28
    28