Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Ethnographic Studies of Homeownership and Home Mortgage Financing: An Introduction

Mitchell Ratner
Cityscape
Vol. 3, No. 1, Ethnicity and Homeownership (March 1997), pp. 1-11
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20868447
Page Count: 11
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ethnographic Studies of Homeownership and Home Mortgage Financing: An Introduction
Preview not available

Abstract

Expanding homeownership opportunities for American immigrants and minorities requires an understanding of the constraints that individuals and families face when they make decisions about homeownership and when they take actions directed toward homeownership. To acquire a better understanding of the process, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and Fannie Mae sponsored a research project that focused on the way minority and immigrant households make the transition from renting to owning their own homes. This article introduces the four studies, the first to apply ethnographic field methods to the study of homeownership. After a discussion of the project's history and research methods, the article highlights four types of barriers that prevent many minority and immigrant families from becoming homeowners. The barriers are: lack of appropriate, affordable housing; limitations of existing financing tools; lack of home purchasing knowledge, credit knowledge, and credit judgment; and cultural gaps, biases, and misunderstandings.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11