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The Significance of Intra-Occupational Mobility: Some Methodological and Theoretical Notes, Together with a Case Study of Engineers

Robert Perrucci
American Sociological Review
Vol. 26, No. 6 (Dec., 1961), pp. 874-883
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2090572
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Significance of Intra-Occupational Mobility: Some Methodological and Theoretical Notes, Together with a Case Study of Engineers
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Abstract

The major problems facing most researchers concerned with measuring the relative "openness" of the American social structure stem from two difficulties: (1) the use of gross occupational categories to assess the number of occupational shifts between fathers and sons ignores the amount of variation that can take place within any single category; and (2) the statistical procedures used to measure changes over time have focused primarily on "mean mobility rates" and not on internal occupational shifts. The present study focuses upon a single occupational category (Professional) whose members have all utilized an institutionalized avenue of mobility (education). A time-comparative sample of engineers is analyzed to determine the effect of social economic origins upon the relative prestige of one's job position in the professional category, and to make a trend statement as to the relative "openness" or "rigidity" of the American social structure.

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