Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Occupational Mobility and Schizophrenia: An Assessment of the Social Causation and Social Selection Hypotheses

R. Jay Turner and Morton O. Wagenfeld
American Sociological Review
Vol. 32, No. 1 (Feb., 1967), pp. 104-113
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2091723
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Occupational Mobility and Schizophrenia: An Assessment of the Social Causation and Social Selection Hypotheses
Preview not available

Abstract

An ongoing study of schizophrenic males provided an opportunity to study factors associated with the relationship between social class and schizophrenia under conditions that minimized the objections often raised against such investigations. Analysis of patients' occupations supported the typical finding of a substantially disproportionate number of schizophrenics in the lowest occupational category. In attempting to uncover the source of this over-representation, it was determined that the fathers of the patients were also over-represented at the lowest prestige level, but to a lesser degree. Although this observation lent some general support to the view that social factors contribute to the occurrence of the disorder, it appeared to make only a minor contribution to the observed over-representation. Detailed analysis of the occupational movement of patients relative to their fathers clearly indicated that subject over-representation results primarily from downward mobility. An effort was made to distinguish the relative contributions of social selection (the failure of patients to ever attain expected levels) and social drift (the movement from higher-level to lower-level jobs within one's own career) to the observed downward mobility. These analyses led to the conclusion that social selection accounts, in largest measure, for the downward shift, with social drift making a relatively minor contribution.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113