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Revival Religion and Antislavery Politics

John L. Hammond
American Sociological Review
Vol. 39, No. 2 (Apr., 1974), pp. 175-186
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2094230
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Revival Religion and Antislavery Politics
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Abstract

Theories to explain empirical relationships between religion and political behavior (or other secular behavior) have generally asserted either that such relationships are spurious, explained by variations between religious groups in socioeconomic status, or that they are due to group identification with a religious community rather than a theology. The proposition that religious belief directly affects political attitudes and behavior is here tested with respect to revivals and antislavery voting in nineteenth-century Ohio. It has been claimed that revivals preached a new doctrine which demanded active opposition to slavery. The claim that revivalism had a direct, nonspurious effect on antislavery voting is tested in a multiple regression model which incorporates variables representing social structure, ethnicity, denominational membership, and prior political tradition. The effect of revivalism is strong despite all controls; the revivals transformed the religious orientations of those who experienced them, and this transformation affected their voting behavior.

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