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A Theory of Middleman Minorities

Edna Bonacich
American Sociological Review
Vol. 38, No. 5 (Oct., 1973), pp. 583-594
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2094409
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Theory of Middleman Minorities
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Abstract

Starting with the concept of "middleman minorities" developed by Blalock (1967:79-84), encompassing such groups as the Chinese in Southeast Asia, Jews in Europe, and Indians in East Africa, this paper presents a model which tries to explain the development and persistence of the form. A key variable is the orientation of immigrants towards their place of residence, with sojourning at first, and later a "stranger" orientation affecting the solidarity and economic activity of the ethnic group. These in turn arouse the hostility of the host society, which perpetuates a reluctance to assimilate completely, or "stranger" status.

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