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Race, Regional Labor Markets and Earnings

Toby L. Parcel
American Sociological Review
Vol. 44, No. 2 (Apr., 1979), pp. 262-279
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2094509
Page Count: 18
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Race, Regional Labor Markets and Earnings
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Abstract

Despite continued interest in racial inequality, studies which effectively integrate structural and socialization/investment explanations of racial differences remain rare. In this paper arguments are presented for using contextual analysis to study individual labor earnings as a function of both background/investment variables and specific dimensions of areal labor market social and economic organization. Analysis from samples of workers (821 whites, 375 blacks) suggests that, in the presence of numerous controls (1) black earnings levels are hindered by racial competition and residential segregation, and facilitated by export sector productivity; and (2) white earnings levels also are hindered by residential segregation, but facilitated by racial competition and export sector productivity. Implications of these findings are explored with regression standardization which suggests that policy seeking to promote racial economic equality must recognize that changes in the racial distribution of resources would not occur independently of changes in the rates of return to resources.

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