Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Decision Making and Non-Decision Making in Cities: Some Implications for Community Structural Research

Richard A. Smith
American Sociological Review
Vol. 44, No. 1 (Feb., 1979), pp. 147-161
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2094823
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Decision Making and Non-Decision Making in Cities: Some Implications for Community Structural Research
Preview not available

Abstract

The literature relating community structural characteristics to policy outputs generally has failed to account for communities not considering an issue as a third type of outcome beyond rejection and adoption. It is argued that nonconsidering communities are likely to be very different from both nonadopters which have considered a policy and have subsequently decided to reject it and from those adopting a particular policy. These types should be separated in research on community structure and community outputs. The current research distinguishes between these three outcome types for fluoridation programs and relates these distinctions to the three important community structural characteristics of structural differentiation, community integration and the centralization of authority within municipal governments. The results of the analysis support the hypotheses, showing that both affinities and disaffinities exist between the communities classified by the three-part outcome typology. Rejecters and adopters are shown to be similar in terms of levels of structural differentiation, and can be distinguished from the less differentiated, nonconsidering communities. Conversely, both nonconsiderers and adopters tend to be more highly integrated and exhibit a greater centralization of authority than rejecters.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
156
    156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
157
    157
  • Thumbnail: Page 
158
    158
  • Thumbnail: Page 
159
    159
  • Thumbnail: Page 
160
    160
  • Thumbnail: Page 
161
    161