Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Size, Centralization and Organizational Adoption of Innovations

Michael K. Moch and Edward V. Morse
American Sociological Review
Vol. 42, No. 5 (Oct., 1977), pp. 716-725
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2094861
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Size, Centralization and Organizational Adoption of Innovations
Preview not available

Abstract

This study concerns attributes of organizations likely to facilitate or inhibit the adoption of innovations by organizations. First, it offers an interpretation of the often-found relationship between size and adoption frequency. Second, it investigates relationships between structural attributes--specialization, functional differentiation and centralization--and adoption and it develops a model which specifies interactions between these attributes and the type of innovation adopted. An interaction between size and centralization is also posited, and the model is tested using data gathered from a sample of U.S. hospitals. The findings on the whole are consistent with the hypothesis that adoption of innovations compatible with the interests or perspectives of lower-level decision-makers occurs more frequently in large, specialized, functionally-differentiated and decentralized hospitals. Centralization and the interaction between size and centralization do not appear to affect adoption of innovations which are not compatible with the interests of lower-level decision-makers. Contrary to expectations, the data indicate that functional differentiation facilitates adoption of this type of innovation. A revised model of adoption behavior is suggested, and its implications for a general theory of organizational adoption behavior are explored.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
716
    716
  • Thumbnail: Page 
717
    717
  • Thumbnail: Page 
718
    718
  • Thumbnail: Page 
719
    719
  • Thumbnail: Page 
720
    720
  • Thumbnail: Page 
721
    721
  • Thumbnail: Page 
722
    722
  • Thumbnail: Page 
723
    723
  • Thumbnail: Page 
724
    724
  • Thumbnail: Page 
725
    725