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Immigration and the Expansion of Schooling in the United States, 1890-1970

John H. Ralph and Richard Rubinson
American Sociological Review
Vol. 45, No. 6 (Dec., 1980), pp. 943-954
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2094911
Page Count: 12
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Immigration and the Expansion of Schooling in the United States, 1890-1970
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Abstract

Our research analyzes the effects of immigration on the rate of growth of educational expansion in the United States from 1890 to 1970. Previous studies have shown that the presence of nativist, Protestant-millenial groups was associated with the early expansion of public primary enrollments. Immigrant groups provide an important contrast to such groups, and several interpretive histories of United States education stress the relationship between immigration and schooling. Using aggregate, time-series analyses, we find that: (1) immigration decreased the rate of growth of public primary and secondary enrollments between 1890 and 1924; (2) immigration increased the rate of growth of private primary and secondary enrollments during this period; (3) immigration increased the rate of growth of public primary and secondary enrollments between 1925 and 1970; and (4) immigration decreased the rate of growth of private primary and secondary enrollments during the period. These findings show that the effect of immigration on the aggregate rate of growth of schooling has varied as a function of the character of the immigrants themselves.

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