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Urbanism, Region, and Tolerance Revisited: The Case of Racial Prejudice

Steven A. Tuch
American Sociological Review
Vol. 52, No. 4 (Aug., 1987), pp. 504-510
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095295
Page Count: 7
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Urbanism, Region, and Tolerance Revisited: The Case of Racial Prejudice
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Abstract

This research examines whether the propositions of Wirth (1938) and Stouffer (1955) concerning the effects on tolerance of urbanism, region, and particular geographic migration patterns can be generalized to racial tolerance. Using prejudice toward blacks as the outcome measure, an analysis of national survey data for the years between 1972 and 1985 indicates that (a) consistent with Wirth's and Stouffer's arguments, urbanites and non-Southerners are more racially tolerant than their nonurban and Southern counterparts; (b) contrary to some previous research, the net effects of urbanism on tolerance have increased over time while region effects have decreased; (c) the effects on tolerance of urban to nonurban migration confirm Wirth's notion of the permanence of urbanism's influence but not Stouffer's culture-shock hypothesis; and (d) the implications of regional migration are more complex than previous research has indicated.

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