Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Beliefs about Inequality and Perceptions of Distributive Justice

Norma J. Shepelak and Duane F. Alwin
American Sociological Review
Vol. 51, No. 1 (Feb., 1986), pp. 30-46
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095476
Page Count: 17
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Beliefs about Inequality and Perceptions of Distributive Justice
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper addresses a number of theoretical and empirical issues derived from distributive justice theory regarding the social psychological process of justice evaluation. Building upon current theory and research, justice evaluation is conceived as a comparison of the rewards one receives with rewards s/he expects. Using data from a 1979 Indianapolis area survey, we examine beliefs about inequality and their role in subjective perceptions of distributive justice. We examine the extent to which "what is" affects perceptions of "what ought to be" using collective beliefs about distribution practices, that is, the extent to which persons perceive departures from justice in terms of existential standards. We find that it is possible to abstract, with a high degree of distinctiveness, a set of aggregate principles representing existential notions about the ways in which individual characteristics are related to household income. We find that this approach to the measurement of reference standards for the evaluation of income receipts has some empirical validity, in that it predicts perceptions of over- vs. under-reward, but such an approach to measuring departures from justice does not produce meaningful variation in measures of satisfaction and acceptance of income.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
30
    30
  • Thumbnail: Page 
31
    31
  • Thumbnail: Page 
32
    32
  • Thumbnail: Page 
33
    33
  • Thumbnail: Page 
34
    34
  • Thumbnail: Page 
35
    35
  • Thumbnail: Page 
36
    36
  • Thumbnail: Page 
37
    37
  • Thumbnail: Page 
38
    38
  • Thumbnail: Page 
39
    39
  • Thumbnail: Page 
40
    40
  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46