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Attitude Similarity in Three-Generation Families: Socialization, Status Inheritance, or Reciprocal Influence?

Jennifer Glass, Vern L. Bengtson and Charlotte Chorn Dunham
American Sociological Review
Vol. 51, No. 5 (Oct., 1986), pp. 685-698
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095493
Page Count: 14
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Attitude Similarity in Three-Generation Families: Socialization, Status Inheritance, or Reciprocal Influence?
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Abstract

This study examines hypotheses of attitude transmission across three ideological domains (gender roles, politics, religion) to access the adequacy of direct socialization, status inheritance, and reciprocal influence models in a developmental aging perspective. Data are from 2,044 individuals, members of three generation families, grouped to form parent-youth (G2-G3) and grandparent-parent (G1-G2) dyads. Results suggest, first, that there is little convergence of parent-child attitudes with age when viewed cross-sectionally. Second, status inheritance processes do account for a substantial amount of observed parent-child similarity, but parental attitudes continue to significantly predict childrens' orientations after childhood. Third, child influences on parental attitudes are relatively strong and stable across age groups, while parental influence decreases with age, although the exact pattern of influence varies by attitude domain.

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