Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Segregation, Tracking, and the Educational Attainment of Minorities: Arabs and Oriental Jews in Israel

Yossi Shavit
American Sociological Review
Vol. 55, No. 1 (Feb., 1990), pp. 115-126
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2095707
Page Count: 12
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Segregation, Tracking, and the Educational Attainment of Minorities: Arabs and Oriental Jews in Israel
Preview not available

Abstract

In recent cohorts, Arab-Israeli men attend post-secondary schools at higher rates than Oriental Jews. This pattern has emerged despite the socioeconomic disadvantage of Arabs, the small share of resources allocated to Arab education, and government efforts to advance the attainment of Oriental Jews. Two explanations for this pattern are tested and corroborated: First, Arabs benefit from a separate school system, whereas Oriental educational levels are depressed because of competition with more privileged European-origin Jews in an integrated school system. Second, at the secondary level Oriental Jews are tracked disproportionately into vocational tracks which divert them from college education, while in the segregated Arab system secondary education is predominantly college preparatory. The paper concludes by suggesting that tracking, used to separate ethno-cultural groups within a school system and depress their educational attainment, is not "necessary" when the groups are residentially segregated, when more direct means of social exclusion can be employed, and when members of the dominant group are shielded from minority competition in the job market.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119
  • Thumbnail: Page 
120
    120
  • Thumbnail: Page 
121
    121
  • Thumbnail: Page 
122
    122
  • Thumbnail: Page 
123
    123
  • Thumbnail: Page 
124
    124
  • Thumbnail: Page 
125
    125
  • Thumbnail: Page 
126
    126