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Accounting for the Male/Female Wage Gap Among Whites: 1976 and 1985

Alison J. Wellington
American Sociological Review
Vol. 59, No. 6 (Dec., 1994), pp. 839-848
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2096371
Page Count: 10
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Accounting for the Male/Female Wage Gap Among Whites: 1976 and 1985
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Abstract

Using detailed information on employment history and training on-the-job from the 1976 and 1985 interviews of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. I examine how differences in these factors account for the wage gap between White men and White women. The percent of the wage gap explained by differences in the explanatory variables increased slightly during this period--from 37 percent in 1976 to 42 percent in 1985. Differences in average years of tenure, total years employed full time, and years out of the labor force since leaving school accounted for almost all of the explained difference. However, over 50 percent of the wage gap remains unexplained.

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