Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Reconsidering the Declining Significance of Race: Racial Differences in Early Career Wages

A. Silvia Cancio, T. David Evans and David J. Maume, Jr.
American Sociological Review
Vol. 61, No. 4 (Aug., 1996), pp. 541-556
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2096391
Page Count: 16
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Reconsidering the Declining Significance of Race: Racial Differences in Early Career Wages
Preview not available

Abstract

Over a decade ago, Wilson (1980) argued that race was declining in significance as a determinant of economic rewards. In response to his critics, he asserted that young Blacks in the 1970s were closing the earnings gap with their White counterparts; he gave no indication that he thought the trend toward racial parity in earnings would reverse. We tested Wilson's assertion by comparing the net effect of race on hourly wages for two cohorts of young workers. We also decomposed the racial gap in hourly wages into a discrimination component and a nondiscrimination component. Our samples were taken from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics in 1976 and 1985. Contrary to Wilson's proposition, we show that: (1) The effect of race, net of controls, increased during this time, and (2) the proportion of the racial gap in hourly wages due to discrimination (i.e., not explained by racial differences in measured qualifications) increased between 1976 and 1985. We contend that the government's retreat from anti-discrimination initiatives in the 1980s resulted in organizational discrimination against Blacks and contributed to a reversal in the postwar trend toward racial parity in earnings.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
541
    541
  • Thumbnail: Page 
542
    542
  • Thumbnail: Page 
543
    543
  • Thumbnail: Page 
544
    544
  • Thumbnail: Page 
545
    545
  • Thumbnail: Page 
546
    546
  • Thumbnail: Page 
547
    547
  • Thumbnail: Page 
548
    548
  • Thumbnail: Page 
549
    549
  • Thumbnail: Page 
550
    550
  • Thumbnail: Page 
551
    551
  • Thumbnail: Page 
552
    552
  • Thumbnail: Page 
553
    553
  • Thumbnail: Page 
554
    554
  • Thumbnail: Page 
555
    555
  • Thumbnail: Page 
556
    556