Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

The Effect of Social Relationships on Psychological Well-Being: Are Men and Women Really So Different?

Debra Umberson, Meichu D. Chen, James S. House, Kristine Hopkins and Ellen Slaten
American Sociological Review
Vol. 61, No. 5 (Oct., 1996), pp. 837-857
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2096456
Page Count: 21
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Effect of Social Relationships on Psychological Well-Being: Are Men and Women Really So Different?
Preview not available

Abstract

We assess evidence for gender differences across a range of relationships and consider whether the form and quality of these relationships affect the psychological functioning of men and women differently. Data from a national panel survey provide consistent evidence that men's and women's relationships differ. However, we find little evidence for the theoretical argument that women are more psychologically reactive than men to the quality of their relationships: Supportive relationships are associated with low levels of psychological distress, while strained relationships are associated with high levels of distress for women and for men. However, if women did not have higher levels of social involvement than men, they would exhibit even higher levels of distress relative to men than they currently do. We find little evidence for the assertion that men and women react to strained relationships in gender-specific ways--for example, with alcohol consumption versus depression.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
837
    837
  • Thumbnail: Page 
838
    838
  • Thumbnail: Page 
839
    839
  • Thumbnail: Page 
840
    840
  • Thumbnail: Page 
841
    841
  • Thumbnail: Page 
842
    842
  • Thumbnail: Page 
843
    843
  • Thumbnail: Page 
844
    844
  • Thumbnail: Page 
845
    845
  • Thumbnail: Page 
846
    846
  • Thumbnail: Page 
847
    847
  • Thumbnail: Page 
848
    848
  • Thumbnail: Page 
849
    849
  • Thumbnail: Page 
850
    850
  • Thumbnail: Page 
851
    851
  • Thumbnail: Page 
852
    852
  • Thumbnail: Page 
853
    853
  • Thumbnail: Page 
854
    854
  • Thumbnail: Page 
855
    855
  • Thumbnail: Page 
856
    856
  • Thumbnail: Page 
857
    857