Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Educational Expansion and Schooling Inequality: International Evidence and Some Implications

Rati Ram
The Review of Economics and Statistics
Vol. 72, No. 2 (May, 1990), pp. 266-274
Published by: The MIT Press
DOI: 10.2307/2109716
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2109716
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($19.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Educational Expansion and Schooling Inequality: International Evidence and Some Implications
Preview not available

Abstract

Fairly recent data for about 100 countries indicate that as the average level of schooling increases, educational inequality first increases, and, after reaching a peak, starts declining in later phases of educational expansion. The turning point occurs when average schooling is about seven years. The observed empirical generalization, which seems quite robust, appears to have important implications for educational and distributional policies and for research on the linkage between education and income inequality.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
266
    266
  • Thumbnail: Page 
267
    267
  • Thumbnail: Page 
268
    268
  • Thumbnail: Page 
269
    269
  • Thumbnail: Page 
270
    270
  • Thumbnail: Page 
271
    271
  • Thumbnail: Page 
272
    272
  • Thumbnail: Page 
273
    273
  • Thumbnail: Page 
274
    274