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Degrees Matter: New Evidence on Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education

David A. Jaeger and Marianne E. Page
The Review of Economics and Statistics
Vol. 78, No. 4 (Nov., 1996), pp. 733-740
Published by: The MIT Press
DOI: 10.2307/2109960
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2109960
Page Count: 8
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Degrees Matter: New Evidence on Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education
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Abstract

Because many individuals do not complete their degrees in the standard number of years, previous estimates of diploma effects, which have been based only on an individual's years of education, are biased. Using a data set from a matched sample of the 1991 and 1992 March Current Population Survey that has information on both years of education and diplomas received, this paper improves on earlier estimates and finds that using "true" information on degree receipt substantially increases estimated sheepskin effects of high school and college degrees. Unlike past research, this paper finds that there are few statistically significant differences in sheepskin effects between race and sex groups. The relative returns to Associate's and post-graduate degrees are also examined.

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