If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Pacifists and Their Publics: The Politics of a Peace Movement

Charles Chatfield
Midwest Journal of Political Science
Vol. 13, No. 2 (May, 1969), pp. 298-312
DOI: 10.2307/2110180
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2110180
Page Count: 15
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Pacifists and Their Publics: The Politics of a Peace Movement
Preview not available

Abstract

The effectiveness of pacifists in mobilizing public opinion in order to affect foreign policy in the thirties was largely a function of the dynamics of the peace movement itself and, in particular, of the relationship between the constituencies of each peace society and the specific publics it cultivated. Pacifists depended upon certain coordinating agencies whose appearance of representing a broad peace coalition gave them access to national civic and interest groups. When the peace movement split into pacifist and collective security wings over neutrality policy, the image of coalition was broken, and the coordinating agencies lost importance to publics and pacifists alike. The latter increasingly represented constituent rather than public interest.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
298
    298
  • Thumbnail: Page 
299
    299
  • Thumbnail: Page 
300
    300
  • Thumbnail: Page 
301
    301
  • Thumbnail: Page 
302
    302
  • Thumbnail: Page 
303
    303
  • Thumbnail: Page 
304
    304
  • Thumbnail: Page 
305
    305
  • Thumbnail: Page 
306
    306
  • Thumbnail: Page 
307
    307
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308
  • Thumbnail: Page 
309
    309
  • Thumbnail: Page 
310
    310
  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312