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Vice-Presidential Candidates and the Home State Advantage: Playing Second Banana at Home and on the Road

Robert L. Dudley and Ronald B. Rapoport
American Journal of Political Science
Vol. 33, No. 2 (May, 1989), pp. 537-540
DOI: 10.2307/2111159
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2111159
Page Count: 4
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Vice-Presidential Candidates and the Home State Advantage: Playing Second Banana at Home and on the Road
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Abstract

Extending the Lewis-Beck and Rice (1983) analysis of presidential home state advantage to the vice-presidency shows a much smaller advantage to the ticket. On average the vice-presidential candidate gains only about 0.3 percent more in his home state than expected. The major determinant of the degree of advantage is, as in the earlier work, size of state

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