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Draft Lottery Numbers and Student Opposition to War

Charles F. Longino, Jr.
Sociology of Education
Vol. 46, No. 4 (Autumn, 1973), pp. 499-506
DOI: 10.2307/2111903
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2111903
Page Count: 8
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Draft Lottery Numbers and Student Opposition to War
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Abstract

In this panel study of draft eligible male undergraduates, the impact of the first draft lottery upon student political attitudes is examined. It was predicted that students who drew low numbers would have an increased opposition to war, the Vietnam war in particular. Evidence for this hypothesis, however, was found to be weak. Draft eligible students who drew low numbers did show an increase in the number favoring an immediate withdrawal from Vietnam more often than those who drew high numbers, but the change was not statistically significant. Lottery number had no impact upon the general trend toward increased pacifism in the sample. The salience and power of the draft lottery as a single causal variable is called into question for studies of male college students.

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