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The Social Effects of Standardized Testing in American Elementary and Secondary Schools

David A. Goslin and David C. Glass
Sociology of Education
Vol. 40, No. 2 (Spring, 1967), pp. 115-131
DOI: 10.2307/2112040
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112040
Page Count: 17
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The Social Effects of Standardized Testing in American Elementary and Secondary Schools
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Abstract

A child's I.Q. is increasingly relevant to his educational and occupational career. The data described here fill an important gap in our knowledge about the sociological importance of testing children's I.Q. and reporting test results. It answers four main questions: what are the views of students and teachers regarding the nature of intelligence and the accuracy of standardized I.Q. tests? What are school policies about giving out test scores and how much information do pupils actually receive through formal and informal channels? What sources do students use in judging their own intelligence? How accurate are students' self-estimates and how do student self-estimates affect aspiration?

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