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Ethnic Power and the Public Schools: The New York City School Strike of 1968

Paul Ritterband
Sociology of Education
Vol. 47, No. 2 (Spring, 1974), pp. 251-267
DOI: 10.2307/2112107
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112107
Page Count: 17
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Ethnic Power and the Public Schools: The New York City School Strike of 1968
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Abstract

The New York City school strike was more a struggle between ethnic communities than a labor-management dispute. Once the strike began, educational issues were displaced by ethnic power concerns. The pro-union forces attempted to close the schools while the pro-community control forces attempted to keep them open. Over the system as a whole, the probability of success for both sides was largely a function of the ethnic character of the neighborhood and the school. White ethnics exerted their influence within the school system while Blacks were most effective in working through the neighborhood.

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