Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Differential Exposure to Courses in Two Majors and Differences in Students' Value Responses

David D. Franks, R. Frank Falk and James Hinton
Sociology of Education
Vol. 46, No. 3 (Summer, 1973), pp. 361-369
DOI: 10.2307/2112180
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112180
Page Count: 9
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Differential Exposure to Courses in Two Majors and Differences in Students' Value Responses
Preview not available

Abstract

This research note presents data regarding differences in student responses to value statements and shows that the pattern of "change" differs depending on the major and the number of courses taken in that major. Sociology and business majors are compared since they typically differ along a conservative-liberal social values continuum. This allows a cohort design that can rule out maturation within the general culture (Telford and Plant, 1968) and the liberalizing effects of the general college environment (Jacob, 1957) as a source of change.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
361
    361
  • Thumbnail: Page 
362
    362
  • Thumbnail: Page 
363
    363
  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366
  • Thumbnail: Page 
367
    367
  • Thumbnail: Page 
368
    368
  • Thumbnail: Page 
369
    369