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The Carpool: A Socializing Adjunct to the Educational Experience

Patricia A. Adler and Peter Adler
Sociology of Education
Vol. 57, No. 4, Ethnographic Studies of Education (Oct., 1984), pp. 200-210
DOI: 10.2307/2112424
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112424
Page Count: 11
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The Carpool: A Socializing Adjunct to the Educational Experience
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Abstract

Many locations, modes, and agents of socialization have been examined by sociologists, but there is one that remains conceptually unexplored: the carpool. Carpool socialization falls within the overlapping influence of three primary socializing agents: the peer group, the family, and the school. We investigate the types of interaction occurring both between children and adults and among peers and discuss the patterns and roles that commonly emerge and their impact on the developing child. Three carpool-generated relationships are identified, described, and grounded in the socializing experience: intimate, combatant, and obligatory relations. We conclude by extracting the features of carpool interaction that represent both the normative and interpretive models of socialization and show how the two can coexist rather than compete.

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