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The Relative Roles of Academic, Ascribed, and Socioeconomic Characteristics in College Destinations

James C. Hearn
Sociology of Education
Vol. 57, No. 1 (Jan., 1984), pp. 22-30
DOI: 10.2307/2112465
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112465
Page Count: 9
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The Relative Roles of Academic, Ascribed, and Socioeconomic Characteristics in College Destinations
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Abstract

A multiple regression analysis using a large, nationally representative sample of college freshmen of 1975 suggests that educationally relevant factors have greater power in explaining the nature of college destinations than ascriptive or socioeconomic background factors, but the latter still play a significant role, net of educational factors. Specifically, it appears that both the academically and socioeconomically "rich" become richer (i.e., attend schools having superior intellectual and material resources) while the academically and socioeconomically "poor" become poorer. The net influences of the ascriptive factors of race, ethnicity, and sex are more mixed. The implications of these most recent findings on the topic of college destinations are discussed.

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