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High School Contextual Effects for Black and White Students: A Research Note

Clarence H. Thornton and Bruce K. Eckland
Sociology of Education
Vol. 53, No. 4 (Oct., 1980), pp. 247-252
DOI: 10.2307/2112533
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112533
Page Count: 6
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High School Contextual Effects for Black and White Students: A Research Note
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Abstract

The differential effects of high school socioeconomic status (SES) and ability contexts upon the school and college going experience of white and black males are examined, using the NLS data. Based on past research, it is predicted that the influence of school SES composition will be primarily salutory, while the influence of school ability context will be negative. Further, it is predicted that these offsetting influences interact with race; i.e., blacks enjoy a greater advantage than whites when attending high status schools and are less adversely affected by the depressant effects of academically competitive environments. Although many of the observed results were negligible, general support was found for both sets of hypotheses.

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