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Residential Segregation and School Integration

Steven G. Rivkin
Sociology of Education
Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 1994), pp. 279-292
DOI: 10.2307/2112817
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2112817
Page Count: 14
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Residential Segregation and School Integration
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Abstract

School districts' efforts to integrate schools have largely failed to ameliorate the racial isolation of Black students. The study presented in this article used data on enrollments in public elementary and secondary schools from the Office of Civil Rights to document where students lived and the schools they attended in 1968, 1980, and 1988. The separate identification of the influences of residential segregation and of enrollment patterns in school districts allows for more accurate assessments of school districts' past integration activities and the impact of housing choices on the segregation of students. The evidence indicates that U.S. schools remain highly segregated primarily because of the continued residential segregation of Blacks and Whites and that school-integration efforts have had little long-term effect on residential segregation.

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