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Does Head Start Make a Difference?

Janet Currie and Duncan Thomas
The American Economic Review
Vol. 85, No. 3 (Jun., 1995), pp. 341-364
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2118178
Page Count: 24
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Does Head Start Make a Difference?
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Abstract

The impact of participation in Head Start is investigated using a national sample of children. Comparisons are drawn between siblings to control for selection. Head Start is associated with large and significant gains in test scores among both whites and African-Americans. However, among African-Americans, these gains are quickly lost. Head Start significantly reduces the probability that a white child will repeat a grade, but it has no effect on grade repetition among African-American children. Both whites and African-Americans who attend Head Start, or other preschools, gain greater access to preventive health services.

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