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World War II and Female Labor Force Participation Rates

Mary M. Schweitzer
The Journal of Economic History
Vol. 40, No. 1, The Tasks of Economic History (Mar., 1980), pp. 89-95
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2120427
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
World War II and Female Labor Force Participation Rates
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Abstract

Between the years 1940 and 1947 the demand for female labor in the United States shifted rapidly. Wages for women rose swiftly during the war, then fell suddenly when industries converted to peacetime production. This paper makes use of household production theory to explore the behavior of different segments of the female labor force as they responded to the radical changes in demand brought by World War II. The analysis suggests that a crucial turning point in the efforts to hire women was reached in the second half of 1943.

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