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The Origins of the Federal Budget

Hugh Rockoff
The Journal of Economic History
Vol. 45, No. 2, The Tasks of Economic History (Jun., 1985), pp. 377-382
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2121707
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Origins of the Federal Budget
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Abstract

The federal budget, a long-sought goal of fiscal reformers, became a reality with the passage of the Budget and Accounting Act of 1921. This paper is concerned with one of the key expectations of the reformers, that the adoption of a formal budget would produce better estimates of federal revenues and expenditures. The conclusion is that there is little evidence of a dramatic improvement that could be attributed to the reform, although there is some evidence that the quality of the estimates improved over the long run. The paper then discusses the reasons for and implications of this finding.

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