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Last Hired, First Fired? Unemployment and Urban Black Workers During the Great Depression

William A. Sundstrom
The Journal of Economic History
Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jun., 1992), pp. 415-429
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2123118
Page Count: 15
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Last Hired, First Fired? Unemployment and Urban Black Workers During the Great Depression
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Abstract

Throughout the Great Depression, the unemployment rates of blacks exceeded those of whites in urban areas of both North and South. Among men, this difference was largely due to racial differences in occupational status, whereas among women, unemployment rates were dramatically higher for blacks even within specific occupations. The occupational pattern of the unemployment gap suggests that labor market discrimination played a role, especially in unskilled service jobs.

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